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20121121
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would like to call up two of our committee members on stage if you could all join us please, and if you could all give them a big round of applause so my name is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community in
is important to us and we are ready and we count on the relationship that we have with cal fire. in fact, that's probably the most essential part of this thing for us to be ready to fight future fires. >> colonel. >> thank you very much for allowing us to come here and participate because it is important. we really appreciate very much this opportunity. we're doing well right now but there's khal lefrpgs we can do better on and that's exactly what we're looking forward to do. we're looking forward to build upon and leverage what we're doing here. communications, that was one of the first things. it's different with our active duty forces because you see here, we send our aircraft all around the world. we can't necessarily just invest in some components in the aircraft and call it good because those assets may be gone and deployed but we have work arounds for that. we are looking forward to that as well in addition to the training. lastly is we again kind of relish the opportunity to participate in the operations against an active enemy. at least here, it's fire. we appreciate the fact w
use in san francisco. can you tell us a little bit about that? she is a toilet expert, by the way. >> toilets have all different flows, but carli, you have to have a 1.6 gallon or less. -- currently. >> that is the state plumbing code minimum standard. >> that is going to save your water compared to what a lot of people still have in their bathrooms. they have 3.5 or 5 gallons. that is using a ton of water. >> the year there is a new city ordinance requirement to reduce flow flesh? >> and a lot of manufacturers are real -- are already making those toilets. right here, we have a dual-flush toilet. this toilet uses 1.6 gallons on the full flush and 0.9 on the half less. >> what happened? >> it automatically opens. this is a fancy toilet. we can get to that later. >> this is the half loss, which is how many? >> 0.9. so it is very good toilet, water-saving. and then the other kind of toilet that saves water is and 1.28 gallons a flush. >> i know when people first started selling and installing the 1.6, there were problems with it was not clear in the bowl and all of that. have those g
in and day out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lessons lerbed -- learned and ensure that
one of us carries on. we talked about the acronyms each one of us uses. so, we had a real-world -- a real-live exercise that validated some of the things we talk about this morning. but it was extremely beneficial to not only the u.s. navy and marine corps, but to the international community. >> thank you. another hand? >> [inaudible] my experience with the haiti response. in this casey i was working at the deputy principal committee level and working at the white house. but it was really the first opportunity for this administration to work with a very complex response, and then recognizing for us the supported commander was usaid that normally isn't in the emergency response business. so, it was an educational process of how to move forces and yet support usaid and the role of the country team and port au prince. so, it was very informative there. and to back up when we had the first no fooling hurricane that worked its way up the entire gulf coast, the principal committee calls that were generated during the haiti response were then turned around and then bringing all o
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
, they said let's go somewhere they can't see us because i'm afraid if they see me talking to someone from the collaborative they are going to -- they won't, you know, they're going to treat us differently. and i asked and they said, they don't open the door for us when we want to go in and they're denied visitors. you can see they're clearly fearful. and also i wanted to bring a specific issue regarding a room which i had seen, i had the opportunity to see before i was kicked out. it's room number 220 which had a ceiling that was falling off. could i put the picture right here? i know it's not clear because it's kind of [speaker not understood], but this is the ceiling here. that's the ceiling. >> could you pass it around? >>> sure, i can pass it around here. here you go. this is a picture with broken window. and the [speaker not understood]. and then this is the trash -- yeah, [speaker not understood]. and then this is just a very small example of some of the rodent infestation which is very common in the building. and, in fact, it's not an isolated incident for people who are living the
's tough to fit it in but it's important to fit it in and it will make us more effective. we did an exercise back in may in preparation for this and developed a pretty detailed concept of operations. we built load plan, timelines, spare parts lists, we really got into the weeds, thinking about the second and third tier effects, so i want my relief to understand that and i want him to know where that plan is so he can pull it right off the shelf if this ever happens and be ready to respond quickly instead of trying to figure this all out when we need to be getting underway. >> i'll boil mine down into just one, and that is i will pass to my relief to continue to support events like this and look for opportunities to continue to learn how we best in the military can integrate with our civilian and federal contemporaries to be prepared for an eventuality that we hope will never come, but we certainly should be prepared for. so the one thing i'm passing on is keep the momentum. >> thank you, all. one other benefit that was cited in the after action review and also was mentioned tod
plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around that and then use the plastic just as the thing that keeps it from leak-proof or if i'm taking soup to work, i have my soup in a glass jar but i will throw it in plastic because i don't want it all over my backpack and there's also more stainless steel options which are a little more expensive but that's a one-time investment, just don't lose it, so a box o
participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots of meetings down in san francisco up at the marines memorial, this is a fabulous program, we had a great medical exchange yesterday. senior leaders seminar third year in a row has gotten a lot of attention. we have a lot of new people who haven't been here for the past couple years, we have a lot of people who have been here for the last 3 years, and one of the major consistent people who has been behind this whole program is the chairman of the san francisco fleet week association, general -- major general mike myers who i'm going to ask to come up and make is remarks. >> thank you, lewis. when i accepted the responsibilities for organizing san francisco's fleet week, the guidance given to me by our honorary co-c
strong, and i'll use that word a little bit more loosely and say competent. you must be able to do things. so, if you take that image and you have objectives on the one talon and capability on the other, and you marry them together, that's what we in the united states have been doing, particularly since the end of world war ii. then there we were having propelled the three worlds to victory. the other of us having seen we had an aggressive adversary on our hands and looking back what a horrible last century or so, we had to do better. and we did it by this iteration of objectives and capabilities. and we put together what has amounted to a global economic and security commons from which we all have benefited and continue to benefit. [speaker not understood]. so, we have to keep working at it. and i think the things that have been talked about here are very much in the line of keeping [speaker not understood]. niche a was mentioned this morning. that was a fantastic piece of work by the navy. it turned around the attitudes of niche a toward the united states. it was a the kind of building
anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they ask, or issues that they speak to, like the alcohol licensing unit, that is because i heard you with regard to working with licenses, having security plans so there can be one pinpoint that everything can pass through. commanders are the successors and hopefully it will be around a while and always be resourced. it is really important that you take our input and that we come out for a safer event and that people are going to want to come to san francisco and that they will not have any trepidation again, i think the fact that everything is booming right now in san francisco would go a long way to say that we kind of got this thing figured out, but we can always get better. before i leave and pass
meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be gotten anywhere else. we are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you will not have the same experience. as we do that, enhan
eaters are interested in cuisine. there adventuress. the fact theyuse grea use great ingredients and make gourmet food makes unpopular. >> i have been dying to have these. >> i have had that roach coach experience. it is great they're making food they can trust. >> have you decided? >> we are in the thick of the competition? >> my game was thrown off because they pulled out of my first appetizer choice. >> how we going to crush clear? >> it will be easy. probably everyone has tried, something bacon tell us delicious. >> -- people tell us is delicious. >> hopefully you think the same thing. >> hopefully i am going to win. we're in the financial district. there is a food truck right there. every day changes. it is easy and fun to go down. these are going to be really good. >> how are you going to dominate? >> i think he does not know what he is doing. >> i was thinking of doing [unintelligible] we are underrepresented. >> i was singing of starting an irish pub. that was my idea. >> one our biggest is the corned beef and cabbage. we are asking people what they're thinking in getting some fee
, just immediately taking care of what's in front of us, to a strategic kind of plan that we can now look at and really do the best for the city. >> so the captain and the colonel, through the discussions that took place yesterday, what are some of the things you learned about relating to civilian issues that will exist and how will you be able to help? ?oo ?a northern california has rich and diverse medical response capabilities. it's impressive the types of capabilities, the number of assets, the number of people trained to do these things are. the california national guard has air and land assets that are substantial and can be rapidly deployed to assist the civil responders in their mission to move people, to get things set up, to establish common security. it's a partnership that really needs to happen and is natural. the governor controls the california national guard, he can make forces appear very rapidly in support of a regional disaster, a local emergency or wherever they are needed, and transportation, communication, security logistics capabilities that come to the table rea
to radiation based screening need to be, you know, used either in lieu of or in addition to and that's a very personal decision and a medical decision, but that added risk for those women who are already at higher risk from the very -- the detect is a really important issue, so does that answer your question? >> [inaudible]. >> awesome, okay, so schools, i've talked about some changes that can happen at schools but the reason we wanted to highlight this is because we can talk about federal laws, about state laws and it can feel daunting to think about getting involved in legislation at that level, although we try to make that easy for most to do by signing on to online actions and stuff, but for parents with kids, changing policies at schools can be an accessible thing, joining pta's or talking to the school board about having integrated pest management so kids aren't exposed to pesticides on playgrounds, that's been successful. there's a huge movement to get safer, healthier foods into schools and they just revised the school lunch guidelines, but also you could go organic, you could go loca
will get to know him and talk about the toughest issues facing them. thank you for joining us today. tell us about your background. >> my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's. i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? what motivated you to get involved in politics question marks before i ran for office, and worked in san fra
found. the cost was close to 30 billion u.s. dollars. how we organize, well, we have something similar that you have. we have the national emergency office under the internal affair minister and they have offices in the different counties, in the different places in chile this emergency office request aid directly to the joint chief of staff and joint chief of staff to the army, navy or air force and then we move the pieces to put the aid where they need it. the scenario, the beginning when we face this was the same thing we are talking about in this seminar. the necessity was access because everything was, the delivery was absolutely hampered because of the roads so we have to clean it. water, food, electricity and communications. another need at that time to do that is field hospital generators, housing, sat coms, purifying water systems and mobile bridges. so the force was at the beginning just to distribute the aid and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, n
all the classes at the pacific energy center are free of charge. thanks for showing us an actual system being installed and thank you for being with us. hope to see you soon. >> thank you all for coming, i would like to really briefly introduce bonnie angle with the breast cancer fund, she is going to do a presentation for you on prevention, ways to preventolin ks of chemicals in breast cancer and i'll let her talk about the rest, bonnie, thank you for coming. >> alright. thank you all so much for being here today. i'm very excited to be able to give this presentation to you, unfortunately, i was expecting to have a co-presenter who had a minor accident and visited the emergency room this morning instead of visiting us, so we have plenty of folks from the breast cancer fund and other groups on hand to answer questions, but we are missing our policy geru unfortunately, i don't know how much this audience is familiar with it but we've also been meeting and talking about doing a study of exposures among women firefighters in particular, and so we have some members of that team talki
is ron conway and followed by jewel us trueus and jose and a student at bay cat and the tech of the advisory committee and rhonda simmons the director of the office of workforce development division in owdad. we're going to hold questions until the close of the program which the speakers will answer those questions and with that mayor lee. >> thank you. good morning everyone and go giants. yeah. [applause] well, let me begin by thanking everybody here. when i first began as mayor i said jobs was the most important thing we could do for people to get and i tell you what less than two years later that is still the most important thing that we can be doing and creating jobs, making people have the opportunity to get them and trained and educated and placing them in the newest areas in our technology industry and when ron conway. ron just arrived and got out of at&t together. we worked together and had a personal agreement if we were as a city were to help technology we were going to have technology help us, so less than two years later when i first started the unemployment
of a home. this is one of the tools we use here to assess solar energy. five years ago i was in a position similar to that of many of you. i was a homeowner thinking about solar electricity for my home. i had to answer a bunch of questions. one, does this stuff work? would it work on my home and most importantly, can i afford it? well, i did the research. i bought a system. now i get to share that knowledge and that experience with you. for the next 30 minutes, we'll have a class in solar basics and we'll go out in the field and see an actual solar system being installed. 30 minutes, solar basics, stay with me. >> let's talk about the technology, what is it and how does it work? there are three types of solar actually when you sauk about solar. i want to avoid the confusion to make sure we're focusing on the right one. two of them involve heating water and they're very viable technologies, can be very coast effective but we're not going to deal with them right now. one is solar pool heating. it pumps the water up there, heats it, runs it through there, the sun heats it and back into the po
if we can talk to each other. we had the national guard above us in a helicopter, even though it was really foggy, they didn't see much, but they demonstrated proof of concept that they can connect the video feed. we learned there are limitations in things of band width and video feed that i'm not qualified to talk about, i'm strictly a push to talk guy. we know as a city when the earth moves, things fall, we get a lot of rubble. that's going to be one of our critical, critical things we have to do. we have to be able to move material and personnel and one of the ways we're going to be doing that is how do we actually get the debris off the road so we can put things back to work. so that was the command of control exercise. we had the marine corps, the navy, and the national guard all working with our department of public works figuring out how would they work together. we didn't give them a lot of coaching, we just kind of put them in a tent and said here is your scenario, here's some problems, and we wanted them to work it out and they did. so it was a very successful yea
is for us to sit out there and talk with all the different regional areas including san francisco and make sure we understand how we're going to work together in the event we have an event that takes our services out or is greater than what we're actually expecting and that's the challenge for all of us, all the service providers, is working together to figure out how to make that happen. >> mr. boland. >> this is where we fit into that link. we represent the utilities that protect and build the resill yepbs into the infrastructure. we fill a gap in attitude which is the relationships, distant and local relationships, cross boundaries between the multi disciplines in the utilities. we are able to cross those lines in the counties and step up to state operations so everybody is operating in a common operating picture so everybody understands what's available not only in their jurisdiction, but what kind of resources we can bring to bear, short and long-term, how distant those are, what the qualifications are. we have master resource catalogs designed just like fire scope and cal fire in w
then became our secretary of defense. and many of us that have served thought that he was one of the best secretary of defenses we've ever had. he's currently a senior fellow at the hoover institute and a freeman foley institute of international studies. he is the michael and barbara bavarian professor at stanford university and serves as co-director of the nuclear risk reduction initiative and preventive defense project. please help me welcome our speaker this morning, former secretary of defense william perry. (applause) >> what a pleasure it is to be aboard this symbol of america's millery power, the uss macon island. what a pleasure it is to be among the men and women of our armed forces and the men and women of the first responders of the san francisco bay area. fleet week for many years in san francisco was a somewhat [inaudible] affair and it has been transformed into this great coming together by the military and the first responders, the great coming together of our uniformed personnel and a great [speaker not understood] of san francisco. this amazing transformation in the last
how that would apply if we're using those folks in a humanitarian disaster in california. we're able to treat our folks regardless of the state of licensing in a particular state, though. >> last year when i took a look at the shock trauma platoon, and i'm going to talk to you about that one really cool thing i saw. i have a little bit of medical experience and to see they have effectively a robotic soldier that can go into defib, whose eyes can dilate, they can do pulses both radial and distal and there is a programmer who is effectively testing a battlefield soldier what to do, i found absolutely fascinating as a way to bring a real life experience to that individual. for me that was a fantastic tool that you have and i thought that was wonderful. >> we're going to be -- little advertisement -- we're going to be demonstrating that capability at our display at the marina green so if you'd like to come see that, that's available. >> any final questions? i'd like to thank our panelists very much. as rob mentioned earlier, the exercise series we have put on and started 3 years ago h
mentioned, we are familiar with bob murry & associates because they helped us with our last search and gave us a really good group of folks to choose from. looking back, we can have opinions about it, but we had a really good process. it was -- they delivered. so, i mean, i trust that all three that are being recommended have that kind of a history. so, i'm really happy that we're at this place and would love to move this forward. or as recommended. >> any more questions? commissioner lee. >> what's the next step? what's the next step after we [speaker not understood]? >> we would recommend that you allow us an opportunity to do some vetting on the proposals. once the vetting is completed, it would be our hope that you allow us to communicate with the president sort of any findings that are outside of the norm in terms of what we'd expect on proposals. it would be, i think, in our collective interest to begin the contracting process as soon as a decision is made on a selected vendor. and i'm uncertain in terms of how you want to get to the decision of the [inaudible]. the sooner we're able
to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future, saving for tomorrow and investing that savings and. that is what we have to do. i think it is a tough order of this matter of innovation is part of it. but also getting us to come together. we can talk about regulation and pension and taxes and the government. a lot of that is [inaudible] a survey said housing prices are too high and that is a negative factor on recruitment. i thought, maybe we can bring the prices down. foreclosure works magic. i do not think you want that. you want rising wealth which could translate into a rising houses -- housing prices. you can increase density and breakdown similar rules, you get more people. there's a lot of things. as i drove down here from oakland cut -- oakland, i saw those cars in the ordinary lanes. one pe
they're going to get. i know you're not up there. i'm just using a name. [laughter] >> so, they can't wait for the [speaker not understood] or whatever. they have to go to whoever is open. that's it. >> commission, we do have services to help for people that are coming down for the first time. and that's located on the first floor. our policy is if you know what you're doing, you don't have to stop there. but everybodies has to go to intake. the only people that don't go to intake are the no plan people, the people doing windows or roofs. it's just contractors, not expediters. we do other pretty good systems down there. when we hire staff, i'd like put a building inspector down there to qc plans. one of the problems we identify is everybody wants to go over the counter. not everybody can, so, a lot of people get creative about it and we would like somebody down there, for one, to train staff that's down there. and for two, to establish the limits of when something can be over the counter and when something has to go into intake. we're always fine tuning. we're considering doing spre
term we're using, we're reach a certain draw down level or certain criteria, we reach out to our military coordinators, hence our agreement with the third nraet and the one map locally in san francisco under ir cal fire prides itself on a statistic that we contain 97 percent of all wild fires in california with 10 acres or less and we do this with an aggressive report of incidents, even with a 911 call of smoepk with land, air and ground attack. once fires become to a large enough scale we call mue tour aid, california lass a great mue tour aid system. i think it's looked at nationally because we have souch excellent cooperation with our cooperating agencies. once it reaches that point, the team will come in and assist the local jurisdiction to run that incident. when we start having multiple fires in a certain area, then we get into what we call area command. i think that provides the overview. >> i talked a little bit about mou's and relationships with the marines. maybe we can talk about how is the national guard and dod resources and capabilities integrated into the comm
love you provided us selling out all 89 home games and all the wonderful fanses, and i see some of you that traveled withed team, road warriors to make road games feel like home games. you inspired us. we know you filled this plaza on sunday when we were in detroit. we know you cheer friday your couches at home, from your neighborhood street parties and then throughout october with the city we lit up the city. it was a washid orange from coit tower to the ferry building to right here at city hall. what can we take away from our 2012 giants? i believe we can take away life lessons. vuch teachable moments for our children and our team did face challenges and whether facing injuries or newly acquired players or facing elimination game one after another. what were the life lessons? never give up no matter how high the mountain is to climb. have integrity and conduct yourself with professionalism. did this team do that? absolutely. play with a team with unselfish devotion. trust one another and love your team teammates and in always do so have fun and it's meant to be played a
to the right of us here. everybody is so excited. and they really are gathered all over to see the world series champ. we're standing at a security checkpoint but we're going to go get an exclusive and check out the press risers. so, let's go. thousands of fans in the crowd, everyone is so excited. how are you guys doing? [cheering and applauding] >> everyone is excited at city hall. they've got a huge seating area out front here to make sure everybody gets a good view of all the action. as you can see from the jumbo tron, the fa raid has already begun and the giants are working their way up market and they're going to end up here at civic center. they've got so much media here and nine camera productions. look at this huge train they've got here. the anticipation is building. the giants are almost here. everyone is ready for their arrival. the comcast crew is ready, and they've got two large sports cameras to capture all of the action. the commentators are here. they're excited. they want to comment. we're excited. the fans are excited. should be about 15 minutes or so till we see the giants.
volleyball program is available at richmond rec center. please visit us onli>> and it is my hoo introduce governor jerry brown of california. i think. ok. in ibm research, one of the things we talk about is our laboratories. i have been all over the world, live in different countries. i am a relatively recent transplant to california. i would like to let the governor know that i am happy to be here. it is a good space. recently, governor brown has spent a lot of time, focus, and effort making california a better place. focus on eliminating waste, increasing efficiency, decreasing the budget deficit, and real focus that we appreciate in northern california on clean energy. for example, moving the state's goal to be 33% clean energy producing. it is my privilege to welcome governor brown to the panel. [applause] >> and to introduce our next panelist, i would like to welcome steve ballmer, senior bp -- vp. >> good morning and thank you. next up is governor hickel lipper -- hickenlooper. he is the serieaal a entreprener each of you have in your respective parts. he became very succe
occurs in the gulf port area during katrina. they expected us to learn from that and indeed we have. i caution you again, we are not prepared, we are not prepared for the next nightmare scenario, but we can better prepare ourselves every day with the activities you are taking on now. i thank you in advance for the family, the child, the son, the daughter, who has no idea that their life is going to be uprooted by catastrophe within the confines of the san francisco bay area or perhaps in a western pacific nation or in africa or south america. i thank you in advance for the good work you are going to do. because there's going to come a point, be it an ert quake, be it a tsunami, be it a man-made heinous terrorist catastrophe, that makes a large group of people feel helpless and feel hopeless. your efforts today, your passion, your commitment, your desire to make a difference, will give help and give hope to those people. it may be your family or it may be a family across the world. it is what we do, it is what you do and i'm proud to count myself among you. so i thank you i
they're adding a floor, residential occupancy or they're going to be changing use from garage residential, even a portion of, to give better guidance. * especially again, police and fire and building have to be coordinated in these reviews. so, like i said, it was a real good meeting. i know on item number 4, you have the overall umbrella permit for sprinklers, for sprinkler coverage for high-rise buildings. that is a great thing for helping expedite the programs. i know the director's staff has worked with fire, so, we're all on board with that and everything. it's nice to be here again and happy thanksgiving to you all, too. >> thank you. >>> good morning, commissioners. happy holidays. my name is robert davidson, i live in the bayview, 90 21 4. i'm here for [speaker not understood]. one is an emergency demolition order that was signed on august 7th for some properties on the corner of thornton and 3rd street in the bayview. properties are still there and i understand that the department is working on them. but we'd like to get the buildings knocked down. second item is 48
and the board of supervisors over the years. the history on this is it used to be that these public bathrooms had gender labels for men and women. and the code was changed back in 1994, 1995 because the city saw that there was a greater demand for men in these rooms and yet there were women in the residential hotel that didn't have any bathrooms. so, the code was changed to a schedule that requires at least two of these facilities, a water closet, a bathing facility and sink if the laboratory sinkses aren't in the rooms, tub shower, tub shower combination. at least two for every floor of occupancy that has two to 20 rooms. and from 21 to 30 it goes up to 3 and, 4 and 5 as we go in increments of 10. in this situation for this particular building we've got 19 guest rooms on the first floor, 22 guest rooms on the second, 22 on the third. so, of that, there are some private bathrooms. the first has 8, the second two have 9. you essentially have at least 11 guest rooms with no bathrooms on the first floor of occupancy and 13 on the second two. so, obviously this falls within the 2 to 20 range so y
as much. using fill brick was great installation but not so great during shaking. so all these buildings were damaged and unstable and people were afraid. which takes me to the people. because i've met a lot of people in my life. i've dealt with people, the very rich and the very poor. as a paramedic, you only see people when they are having a really bad day. that's what one of my mentors explained to me early on. no matter what you think when you walk in the door, remember it's the worst day they've had in a while, whether or not it's your day or not. and there's something to be said for that. so the story of the van people. first of all, i have to get a little bit of politics here. it's a heavily kurdish region. this is eastern turkey. van is the largest settlement in eastern turkey. at that time its peak it had about 700,000 people in it during the summer. beautiful like, absolutely gorgeous place to be. after the earthquake everybody who could leave, did. so what you have left are those that are either die-hards, the people that are the leaders of the community that want to
going to use my chance just to ask one last question. do you believe that you have marked fashion history? >> it is difficult to say. is it my purpose? i do not know. i think that's everybody is marking fashion history in a way. as much as journalists because they show the people. what is fashion history? some old clothes that you can find may be in the free-market? books, magazines, newspapers? i think that i am part of that, but to think that me, i'm mark -- i do not think so. it is not exactly my purpose. it really seems very selfish to do what you love. >> i'm glad i managed more or less to silence you with my question. [laughter] i would like to say that i believe you have marked fashion history in the best way by creating clothes, which have been a mirror to society as it changed and as it happened, and you will be known for that as much as for the beauty of the close. thank you so much for giving us the chance to talk to you. [applause]
was going on when you did it. can you tell us about those madonna corset years? >> yes, it is a kind of a reflection of what is happening. also a reflection of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we
, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but beautiful. i said, i want to show this girl which is different. does not know how to walk as a model. they have their own personality. i remember this year i was asking a professional model to walk to see if there wer
. there's no conditional use requirement to have this. a lot of people today want to have food, drink, and be able to have some music. how can we get the limited live entertainment excluded from the know amplified or no live entertainment excluded on the transfers? >> that is going to mostly driven locally. most of the conditions you'll ever see on an abc license are because we rely, to a great extent, on the police department and local officials to determine what is best for their communities. i'm not trying to pin this on you guys or blame you guys, but we do try to work with you. we do not tend to want to overrule the police department very often. now that said, i get a fair number of petitions and appeals to me. typically, they are from the neighbors. i want to see that there is actually a practical problem posed -- that the condition is there to solve, not that this is the way the things have been or maybe there's someone who is satisfied by what is potentially wrought by having live entertainment. it is always a case by case. generally, very deferential -- i am very deferential
with us. he's one of the graduate interns and mentor him in his production company start up. all the cities and the program's investment in tech sf for continuing to provide pathways for people like me for us and show us connections between our passion for media and technology and turn that passion not just into a job but a career so thank you very much. [applause] >> and rhonda simmons director of the office of workforce development position and then we will following this we will close. [applause] >> wow it's been a long time coming for this. so started about two years ago with the grant process and i want to thank again mayor lee for the support and submitting the proposal. like he said we have roughly $8 million to do this over the four year period of time. you can seat students before us. the goal is placement ultimately and make sure they're placed in the field of technology. if you have been in this cycle and you have done work for us you know it's all based on the labor market and we're in a boone in this town and one of the reasons we were able to secure the grant i
that should work for us. the room [speaker not understood] the private bathroom actually do face the corridor. so, it's going to be a job, but i think if we can at least apply for the permit [speaker not understood]. hopefully we should be able to provide extra bathrooms. thank you. >> do i have a second? >> yes. commissioner mar seconded. >> i think ben wants to say something. >> thank you. i want to reiterate what commissioner walker and rosemary -- sorry. i want to reiterate what commissioner walker and what rosemary mentioned about the whole -- why this whole program was designed. i think the whole reason -- of course, why [speaker not understood] is here is because we are to actually leverage some of the work that dbi does. so, when we go into the buildings, we are able to resolve some of the issues between management and tenants. so, therefore, dbi inspectors don't need to spend a lot of time to get inspectors to come in. they can use that time to do another inspection with much more severe building. so, i think the whole -- and also what our role work, we have much more leverage betwee
it to the city of san francisco and had a specification, i'm giving it to the city that will be used forever for the enjoyment forever of the people of the city of san francisco. it has ever since. every summer the stern grove association in san francisco rec and parks put on 10 free concerts. usually people come out at 10 in the morning it's a family affair. everybody is on the lawn with picnics and it's free. anybody can come out. it's a great way to spend a sunday. >> goes to 1-2 in the afternoon and runs until 5. [music]. thanks to the stern grove association they renovated the concert meadow. it used to be a rolling grafsy area. put in a new stage and stage building. they put in terraces. we get from 8,000 to 12,000 people. and the meadow next to the concert meadow is full of people even though they can't see the music they hear it. i walked into the meadow several times and they don't even care. we do have literally events going on day and night. the concert association has kids days during the week. the performers come out for hundred 200 kids. now, the truckadero truck house gets re
ever so slightly. and it is beating like a heart. if-0 when as of the forces of nature moving around us every second. >> shadow patterns reflect the shapes of the hanging sculptures. the new terminal also features a children's play areas. both of the market the exploratory n.y. -- exploratorium. the offer travelers of all ages a playful oasis. using high quality plywood, they created henches shaped like a bird wings that double as musical instruments. serving as a backdrop is a mural featuring images of local birds and san francisco's famous skyline. >> in the line between that is so natural, you can see birds and be in complete wilderness. i really like that about this. you could maybe get a little snapshot of what they are expecting. >> it is an interactive, keck sculpture that is interacted with by the visitor. >> they are a lot about and they fall down the belt. it moves the belt up, and if you turn that faster, the butterflies fall in the move of words. >> the art reflect the commission's commitment to acquiring the best work from the bay area and beyond. in addition to the five ne
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